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20121201
20121231
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KRCB (PBS) 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
and he beg years ago with what seemed a more straightforward mission, a shelter and school for orphans. today 800 children are housed at several centers. this one taking in the overflow functions out of converted shipping containers. the shelter's young managers themselves grew up here. billie jean is one. he was brought at age 3 to the orphanage. today he works to mast english and is in law school. >> my mother was pregnant very early, about 16 years old. my father took off. then my mother couldn't take care of me. she decided to -- she heard about it, and she decided to put me there. >> his mother visits occasionally he says, but the orphanage is very much his family. >> that's our goal, it to restore the family over one generation to raise the children together so they have memories of their own childhood, restored childhood and later in life they become aunts and uncles to each other's children and their family regenerates after a generation. that's our goal. we have a community of families broken by tragedy. >> the tragedy of haiti's aids epidemic brought big change for the organi
systemic mistakes, not giving the security that was requested, ignoring these -- begging of the people in an gauzy for extra help. we end up with the first slain ambassador in 30 years, and where does the buck stop? with three people nobody has ever heard of who have never been named. there was one name, the others have not been. the secretary of state is not at the hearings because she has an illness and her underlings are their. >> are you suggesting she is taking an illness? >> i am saying she is absent from a hearing where she should have been the one to have taken the responsibility or to explain what the phrase means, but stops here, if it does not stop with her but with underlings. >> i do think the secretary of state has to testify and has to testify not as the department's budget of the future policy, not simply for the resolution of the questions tt persist en afte the report, which was devastating. at the same time, if she is to have any political ambitions beyond presidential prospects, just in her own self-interest, beyond a national interest, she has to fully explain and
. you see more people begging-- and a different class of peoplei begging, people who had recently been sort of somewhere at the bottom of the middle class. >> brown: stallings is trained as a classicist, reading ancient greek and latin.phlu she did an acclaimed translation of the roman philosopher, lucretius' "the nature of things." and her own poetry has garnered several prizes. in 2011 she was the recipient of a macarthur fellowship, the so- called "genius award." her latest collection, titled "olives," explores, among other things, ancient and modern lives in her adopted home.th >> there's weirdly a lot of energy in athens, and, whether it's good or bad, there's a feeling. >> brown: what kind of energy? >> maybe there's a "there's nothing left to lose" as a kind of freedom as well. people are going out to plays. they're still going out and doing things, but, you know with less money. but there's an urgency. poetry meetings are very well attended.li literary events are packed. >> brown: why do you think that is? >> well, it's inexpensive, inexpensive entertainment. ( laughs ) but i t
to a weaker dollar, probably higher gold prices, and more interday volatility. >> susie: so that begs the question then, what should investors be doing with their money. they know rates are really going to be super low for a while. we know the wall street saying, "don't fight the fed." so where should people put their money right now? >> the most likely scenario is that you get a bit of tranquility and then something breaks. and it breaks in the sense that systems are not built to be run at artificial interest rates. and with the fed being both a player and a referee in markets. so the most likely outcome is the benefit of tranquility and then a higher risk of something breaking. so what we're doing is taking down risks. it is a wonderful time for risksset it is time to reduce your risk exposure, and it is time to build a little more inflation protection in your portfolios. >> susie: mohammed, are you buying treasures at this time? would you suggest investors get back to treasuries? >> i would say focus on inflation protected treasuries or tips. part of this message from ben bernanke
. you kw, they not onlywn the twilight saga and hunger games which are begging obviously for sequels but big tv production studio as well, have mad men, weed, anger management, a lot of food renewal seasons ahead for those and lots of sequels on the movies, the stock is only 11 times earnings, we think there is more to go, although the name has done well. >> aqua financial a new pick here, ocn. >> this stock shot more than double this year, 34 and change, how much higher in the next twelve months, do you think? >> well, i think it can go higher, it had a little pullback today and i think it i attractive on pullback, they are the low cost producer of servicing mortgage debt, particularly the low quality sub prime mortgage debt, new york banks want out of that, they have gotten the book from j.p. morgan, morgan stanley, goldman sachs, they are the low cost producer provider, only sell nine or ten times forward earnings, the valuation is expensive and i think the stock has room to go and maybe another two or three years to it. >> you have positions in both of those shares, sandy? >> the
and thirst, and i send down a famine, when they pray for the sun, and i drown them with rain, and they beg me for reasons, my only reply is: i never apologize, never explain. when the angel of death is a black wind around them and children are dying in terrible pain, then they burn little candles in churches, but still i never apologize, never exain. when the christians kill jews, and jews kill the muslims, and muslims kill writers they think are profane, they clamor for peace or for reasons at least, but i never apologize, never explain. when they wail about murder and torture and rape, and unlucky abel complains about cain, and they ask me just why i had planned it like this, i never apologize, never explain. of course, if they're smart they can figure it out -- the best of all reasons is perfectly plain. it's because i just happen to like it this way -- so i never apologize, never explain." >> job kept asking why -- >> poor thing, yeah. >> and never got an answer. >> no. >> jesus himself, "oh, god, why hast thou forsaken me?" no answer. >> i'm not so impervious to the world that i don't kn
with the different ideas can follow you. and you can do that not in a dictatorial way but not also begging, you know, you cannot say to a musician, excuse me, can you please give me this. even if it is a story of carlos cliver, great conductor that was a friend, great friend of mine. we wer very, very good friends. and during a rehearsal, he was asking a german orchestra for a pianissimo. and the players answered almost in a rude way saying i am playing piano, i am playing piano, sometime you have this kind of answer. and clyber answered, said, you know, conductors are not dictators. we are like poor man outside the church. with our hat in the hand. and if we have one penny, we are happy. but if we receive two, we are more happy. so it was a very great answer. we ask, we don't demand we ask for something. and when you have a great orchestra, with a great orchestra you can get what you want. so if you don't get what you want, it's your fault. >> rose: it's your fault if yo don'tet it. >> for several reasons. because are you not good enough. are you not loved. we are not liked. they don't trust you. y
there once in jordan in 1997 mossad agents poisoned him. king hussein begged benjamin netanyahu for the antidote. and israel's leader then as now eventually handed it over. meshaal backed a steady stream of suicide bombings which israel's separation wall has largely stopped and the hamas earlier this year, meshaal left his home damascus abandoning the assad regime to its fate. he's also making peace overtures to president abbas, his palestinian rival in the west bank. >> -- hamas government in gaza. >> and the hamas leader may still be a wanted man. palestinian police have been rehearsing the drill for any assassination attempt. >> is >> sreenivasan: israel and the u.s. consider hamas a terror organization. the israelis had little to say about today's visit. the death toll has passed 500 in the typhoon that smashed into the philippines on tuesday, with more than 400 people still missing. rescuers dug through mud and debris again today, to retrieve bodies in the hardest hit compostela valley region. some 250 people died there. more than 300,000 others lost their homes in the stor
hasn't put forward spending cuts, one, it begs the question, what spending cuts have the republicans put forward? >> reporter: the president was asked if he was optimistic about reaching a deal. >> still a work in progress. >> reporter: but senate majority leader harry id said repubcansn coress should yield to public opinion about tax increases. >> speaker boehner knows or should know that the middle- class tax help that we have to pass would sail through the house of representatives. democrats would overwhelmingly vote for it. i would doubt there could be any democrat that would vote against it. and as we know from the chorus of republicans that are added to every day, more republicans join every day. >> reporter: in fact, new polls show americans do want compromise, and it's the democrats who hold the edge. an nbc/"wall street journal" poll released yesterday shows a majority. 65% say president obama has a mandate on both increasing taxes on the wealthy and reducing federal spending; a similar two- thirds are willing to accept tax increases or cuts in federal government programs to
years begging for something to do. he's sitting in this cell, this man in philadelphia prison and dickens reports in american notes that he just sits there wearing a paper hat of his own manufacture. it's the coldest possible moment about what it is to be a writer with nothing to do. sort of all the themes of dickens' own agony and the darkest piece of dickens and the grotesque nature. >> no white man ever slavery as charles dickens. it has something to do with the childhood sense of imprisonment we're talking about. a critic has pointed out that there's a record where dickens transcribes catalogues of escaped slaves from the south. in this one case he silences the theatrical voice and simply writes down what he's reading. in this one case you can't out-dickens the reality of how gruesome this was and that kind of hatred of slavery and also some personal bell had been rung of being rung. >> it looks very impressive looking back at this. how vocal and powerful a critic of slavery dickens was at that time. of course his voice was very loud to the readers. therefore it was very i
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)